Friday, June 5, 2020

Wee-Sources: Hope, Opportunity, and Pep Up Poetry

Hello dear Weaders,





Recent events in my home country of the United States have saddened me in profound ways. Now more than ever I have found myself overcome with a need to find bright spots filled with hope, opportunity, and poetry. It is my goal to make Wee Words for Wee Ones a place filled with those things for you all as well.

Here are this week's Wee-Sources:










I'm all for the use of four-letter words. Depending on the time and place, nothing can convey how I feel quite like a well-chosen four-letter word. In this particular time and place, the four-letter word I am choosing over and over is HOPE.

There is a line in the poem, "Blessing of Hope" by Jan Richardson from her book The Cure for Sorrow: A Book of Blessings for Times of Grief that goes like this:

hope is not made
of wishes
but of substance

Isn't that beautiful to think about? That hope is not just a wish, but has substance? What substance is your hope made of?

For me as a writer, my hope is found in the creating: putting words together to find coherence, putting sentences together to find cohesion, putting paragraphs together to find meaning. When I go from nothing to something, I find hope. A blank mind to an idea, I find hope. A blank page to a poem, I find hope. A blank computer screen to a blog post, I find hope.

The substance of my hope cannot change policy or history, but maybe it will give a child (and their parent) moments of joy and diversion that can uplift their spirit. And to do this my words need to be published. In that spirit I am sharing with you a couple of submission opportunities that I found at a blog called, Publishing...and Other Forms of Insanity. These Cricket Media opportunities are for their youngest markets for which I am most interested, but the blog has a variety of other publishing opportunities as well. I have pitched to the Cricket Media group periodically over the years without success, and once again, I am going to embrace hope and submit again. Will you join me?







Ladybug: Making Make Believe (ages 3 - 6). Genre: Short stories, poetry, rebus stories, and songs to fuel the young child’s imagination. "We’re interested in work with an imaginative or magical twist, whether it’s a contemporary story of children at play, a gentle fantasy, a retelling of a folk or fairy tale, or an exaggerated story told by a narrator who might not be entirely reliable. LADYBUG accepts fiction up to 800 words (shorter work is fine) and poetry up to 20 lines. For our young audience, we are looking for lively writing that begs to be read aloud, as well as playfulness, humor, and lyricism." Payment: Stories and articles: up to 25¢ per word. Deadline: June 15, 2020.

Ladybug: My Family (ages 3 - 6). Genre: Short stories, nonfiction, poetry, rebus stories, and songs about family life. "Send us stories about the personal or cultural traditions that make each family special: celebrating holidays, passing down jokes and stories, annual scavenger hunts, favorite trips, and more. Whether funny or heartfelt, we’re interested in stories about the routines and rhythms that give young children a sense of belonging. LADYBUG accepts fiction up to 800 words, nonfiction up to 400 words, and poetry up to 20 lines." Payment: Stories and articles: up to 25¢ per word.  Deadline: June 15, 2020.

Babybug: Beep-Beep, Vroom-Vroom! (for babies and toddlers). Genre: Poetry, action rhymes, finger plays, and simple stories about all kinds of vehicles. "For inspiration, you might think of little ones who are fascinated with construction sites or sailboat-filled harbors, or those who love watching bicycles, trains, buses, and garbage trucks. Please keep manuscripts short; poems can be up to eight lines and stories up to six sentences. When we read submissions, we are especially interested in rhythmic writing that babies and toddlers will want to hear again and again." Payment: Stories and articles: up to 25¢ per word. Deadline: June 15, 2020.

Babybug: Breezy Summer. (for babies and toddlers). Genre: Poetry, action rhymes, finger plays, and very short stories that celebrate summertime. "Your work might explore sunny outings to the park or beach, the season’s special games, sights, and sounds, or some other interesting aspect of summer. We’re looking for playful writing that the very young will want to hear again and again. Please be concise; poems can be up to eight lines and stories up to six sentences." Payment: Stories and articles: up to 25¢ per word. Deadline: June 15, 2020.











 Last week I told you about Kathryn Apel's Poetry Pep Up. I have completed the daily prompts and wow, my poetry has definitely pepped up thanks to Kat! Take a look:

Day One: The challenge was to create a Zentangle Poem:
    Below is my zentangle. I used a random page from Turtles All the Way Down by John Green:

    the silence between us
    wanted to know
    what is 
    a reward
    you give 
    to forget
    being vulnerable
    ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved.

    Day Two: The challenge was to create an epigram and/or a solage. I chose to do both.

    My attempt at an epigram is actually a revision of a poem I wrote previously:

    as I open wide the lesson in oral hygiene is drilled in
    ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved.

    And here is my attempt at a solage:

    fire ant bites
    my toe ignites
    inflamed
    ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved.

    Day Three: The challenge was to write a Tetractys poem. 
    This is my tetractys:


    cow
    chews cud
    cocks her head
    to eye my pup
    she lows, "don't come near my calf" as we pass
    ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved.

    Day Four: The challenge was write a poem based on a photo.


    My picture poem is reflective of the collective spirit in my household right now:

    Day Five: The challenge was to write a Golden Shovel poem.

    My strike line is the above line from the poem "Blessing of Hope" by Jan Richardson.

    In my privileged bubble, my hope
    usually selfishly centers around nothing of consequence. Is
    it my fault I don't realize what is happening to those not
    like me? YES! My reality is made
    of opportunities afforded me by the oppression of 
    those deemed "other". People whose wishes
    are just as filled with hope but
    their odds of achievement are based on the color of
    their skin, not their substance.
    ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved.

    Please meander over to Reflections on the Teche where Margaret has a Golden Shovel poem of her own as she host Poetry Friday this week.


    25 comments:

    1. I've bookmarked your marvelous post, Bridget. I've been swamped with the bookstore and having the grandgirls this week so couldn't do Kat's challenges. I love yours, so varied in their flavor, funny & serious, too. Thanks for the submission stuff, too! May we have some better news waiting for our future!

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      1. Thank you, Linda! I'm glad you have been busy with the bookstore and have had your grandgirls this week - no better reasons to postpone these challenges. I look forward to what you come up with if you do give them a try. I'm all for better new... :)

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    2. I love the zen tangle poem! I need to try it! Thank you for sharing.

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      1. Thank you, Amy! Yes, the zentangle was fun. When you give it a go, will you share your poem? I'd love to see it. :)

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    3. This post is full of such goodness. I love the word HOPE too, and like you, feel more hopeful when something is created from nothing, whether it's a piece of writing, or a batch of cookies. :)
      I have to say my favorite of your poems from Kat's challenges is the one of Smidgey hiding in the pillows. Also liked your golden shovel as it expresses my feelings too.

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      1. Thank you, Jama! Your something from nothing (yes, please, to the cookies) is much tastier than words. Smidgey has been sandwiching herself between her two beds quite often in 2020. I wonder why? ;)

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    4. This post is a treasure in so many ways. Thanks for the submission ops and all the prompts from the Pep UP. I'm sorry I couldn't get to it, but I'm glad you have shared your work. The golden shovel is so clear and direct.

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      1. Thank you, Janice! I wish you much success if you submit. Maybe you'll be able to Pep Up in the future, then share! :)

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    5. Such a full post! Thanks for sharing! I, too, feel hope when I make something out of nothing. Good luck with your publishing pursuits. I also enjoyed your poems from Kat's challenges this week.

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      1. Thanks, Margaret. I appreciate you stopping by and commenting. :)

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    6. Thanks for sharing all your Poetry Pep Up gems, Bridget. It looks like you had a wonderful week of creativity. Your golden shovel is so strong, and your solage a good giggle. Also your epigram. Youch! A week well written! And cows! (I know that Jack Rusel/cows combination.) So glad you could join us.

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    7. Bridget, it was so much fun to open my day with your poetic goodness. You accomplished all of the challenges in Kat's #PoetryPepUp and much feel very pleased with the variety and flow of your work. Hope is made of substance and you certainly have captured the spirit of hope in your work. Since I struggled with Day 2, I am going to look at your epigram and solange a bit closer and I am almost ready to share my Golden Shovel.I like all of your writings.

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      1. Thank you, Carol for your kind words. I look forward to your Golden Shovel, epigram and solange. I hope you'll share them on your blog! :)

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    8. This one is truly great and right on point for our times:

      In my privileged bubble, my hope
      usually selfishly centers around nothing of consequence. Is
      it my fault I don't realize what is happening to those not
      like me? YES! My reality is made
      of opportunities afforded me by the oppression of
      those deemed "other". People whose wishes
      are just as filled with hope but
      their odds of achievement are based on the color of
      their skin, not their substance.
      ©2020, Bridget Magee. All Rights Reserved

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      1. Thank you, Jeanette! I appreciate that you found it meaningful. :)

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    9. Love this post from top to bottom, Bridget. Your words about hope lift me, the opportunities motivate, and your poems fill my senses and help me to think in new ways. Thank you for that.

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      1. Thank YOU, Michelle for your supportive comment. I truly appreciate it. :)

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    10. Bridget, what a wonderful post. It's so full of goodness from the idea of hope having substance in the beginning to the golden shovel at the end. It must be strange to live outside the US right now. I can only imagine. There is a different feeling here. More and more people that I know are speaking up. I'm hoping this turns into voting in November. I love the zentangle poem so much. I want to run off to write on right now!

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      1. Thank you, Linda! Yes, having my eldest daughter and all of our family still in the states makes our skin crawl/anxiety rise. We've been voting from here and will continue in November. I do hope you write a zentangle and share it with the world. :)

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    11. Thanks for all this poetry goodness Bridget, from "hope," all the way down to your strong and sensitive golden shovel, "Blessing of Hope." Love your "weight of the world, and am intrigued with the zentangle poem form.

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      1. Thank you, Michelle! Smidgey propensity to burrow is sometimes is a direct reflection of how I feel. I'm glad we've got lots of pictures of her doing it to inspire poetry. :)

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    12. Fabulous! Your solage and golden shovel especially captured me, Bridget. Gorgeous.

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